The mission of CAST is to advance our understanding of how electronic structure and bonding influence the chemical and physical properties of heavy elements that lead to the development of game-changing nuclear technologies that improve energy security, environmental remediation, and train the next generation of nuclear scientists.


Professor Highlight

Suzanne Bart

Suzanne C. Bart graduated from the University of Delaware with a B.S. with Distinction in Chemistry in 2001. During this time, she also minored in geology, and participated in undergraduate research focusing on amino acid racemization dating of fossilized shells from the Outer Banks, NC region under the direction of Prof. John Wehmiller. During her college studies, she developed an interest in inorganic and organometallic chemistry, which led her to Cornell University, where she earned her Ph.D. in 2006 with Prof. Paul J. Chirik developing homogeneous iron catalysts with redox non-innocent ligands. Following this, Suzanne moved to Germany to expand her synthetic and analytical skills by studying the reactivity of sterically pressured uranium compounds for small molecule activation as an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow at the Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg under the direction of Prof. Dr. Karsten Meyer. In 2008, she moved back to the United States, where she became an Assistant Professor at Purdue University in West Lafayette, IN. She was promoted to Associate Professor in July, 2014 and to Professor in July. 2018. Her research interests include organometallic transformations and small molecule activation mediated by organoactinide species, with an emphasis on alkyl and redox-active ligands. Suzanne has been the recipient of an NSF CAREER award (2012), and has been named a 2012 Cottrell Scholar, a 2014 Organometallics Young Investigator Fellow, and a 2015 Rising Star from the Women’s Chemist Committee of the American Chemical Society. In 2017 Suzanne became an Associate Editor at the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry. In her independent career, Suzanne has authored over 50 journal articles studying actinide and lanthanide redox and coordination chemistry.